Changing nursing, changing healthcare

Dr. Roswitha Davies 
Guest Blogger

What comes to your mind when you hear the word “nurse?” Do you think of a person who

Dr. Roswitha Davies, Nursing Dept.

Dr. Roswitha Davies

takes care of sick people in a hospital? Do you think of a person who works in a doctor’s office or a clinic who give pills and shots?  Most students who apply to the Nursing program at San Antonio College have an idea of what it means to be a nurse.

When looking at nursing on a broader level of a profession, however, our image is not as clear. Within nursing, we have licensed vocational nurses (LVN) and registered nurses (RN). Both levels are licensed to practice by the state upon completion of their programs, but the amount of training is different. Licensed vocational nurses receive one year of training and a certificate upon completion. Registered nurses may receive their training at a two-year community college and receive an associate degree or at a four-year university where they receive a bachelor’s degree. Registered nurses may further their education at a master’s or doctorate level.

Licensing ensures that all nurses are safe to practice in their jobs, and institutions that hire nurses ensure that the nurse’s job responsibilities do not exceed the level of training the nurse received. However, some research is finding that nurses at the bachelor’s level or higher can better deal with the evolving and complex healthcare system of the future.

In 2008, The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Institute of Medicine undertook an initiative for the purpose of making recommendations for the future of nursing. A report, released in 2010 was titled “The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health.”  Regarding nursing education, the report recommended that “nurses should achieve higher levels of education and training through an improved education system that promotes seamless academic progression.” The report further recommended that by 2020, the proportion of nurses with a bachelor’s degree should increase from 50 percent to 80 percent.

The ability to progress to the next level of education is not new in nursing. Mobility programs have been in existence for many years for LVNs to further their education and become registered nurses. Programs are also available for registered nurses with associate degrees to obtain bachelor’s degrees. Many of RN- to-BSN programs are available but currently only about 17 percent  of nurses with associate degrees continue to a bachelor’s degree. From this report, an idea was born in Texas to reduce barriers in the state that hinder successful academic progression from an associate to a bachelor’s degree in nursing.

This initiative became the Consortium for the Advancement of Baccalaureate Nursing Education in Texas (CABNET). San Antonio College is among 45 community colleges and 16 universities that have expressed interest in participating. In addition to reducing transfer and financial barriers to educational progression, CABNET has taken on a broader goal of revising the way nursing education is taught. Content taught in the various nursing programs would build from basic knowledge and skill taught at community college level to deeper learning at the university level. This common curriculum would eliminate duplication of courses and re-teaching of content that currently exists.

The CABNET plan allows for all required general education courses to be taken at the community colleges that would further reduce tuition costs. Finally, the CABNET plan still allows for the student, upon completion of the associate degree requirements, to become licensed and enter the workforce as a registered nurse. The CABNET initiative is moving into its development phase with the plan to begin implementation in Fall 2013.

Dr. Roswitha Davies is an associate professor in the Nursing Department  @ SAC.

Getting an early start in technology

Troy Touchette
Guest Blogger

Getting prepared for a career in Information Technology can be a challenge. It is essential to have both experience and training for this industry. Training can be expensive and building experience can be difficult.

The training provided in San Antonio College’s Computer Information Systems Department is probably one of the most economical sources in the area. It is top-notch training at a reasonable cost. For those willing to start early, the deal is even better.

The Alamo Academies Information Technology and Security Academy (ITSA) allows area students to take dual-credit courses during their last two years of high school and earn more than 30 hours of college credit at no cost to the student.

The training in this program is provided by San Antonio College and includes the same college level courses taught on the main campus and includes the course ware certified by the National Security Agency to meet the Committee on National Security Systems Standards.

During the summer of their first year ITSA students work in an internship program that gives them valuable experience in the industry. Many of the students continued to work for the organizations after the summer internship  ended. After finishing at ITSA, students can complete an Associate’s Degree in Information Security and Assurance and ultimately can transfer into a Bachelor’s degree at a four-year university.

It’s a very good way to get an early start for those interested in a career in Cyber Security.

Troy Touchette is the new chair of Computer Information Systems:  Alamo.edu/sac/cis
For more information about the Alamo Academies,  www.alamo.edu/academies/

Astronomy vs. Astrology: Words matter!

 David A. Wood Jr.
Guest Blogger

Too often, we are loose with our vocabulary, and we end up saying or writing one thing when we really mean something else. Then our intent changes meaning and confusion reigns. When you are an astronomer, this most commonly occurs when others mistakenly refer to you as an “astrologer.” Astronomy and astrology have a long, intertwined, and tense history, but there is a huge difference between them.

Astrology is a pseudoscience, having more in common with fortune telling than science. It claims to use the Sun, Moon, and planet positions against the background stars to predict human events on Earth. When an astrologer casts a horoscope for you, she claims that your day, week, month, or year are predestined by the relative positions of seven objects, most of which are tens of millions or even hundreds of millions kilometers away! Furthermore, generic horoscopes, based only upon the Sun’s position, attempt to describe the lives of 500 million diverse people whose only connection is that they were born in the same 30-day calendar period. Why, then, are some twins so different?

Astronomy, on the other hand, is a true science that relies on the scientific method to determine how the universe works. Astronomers are not going to cast a horoscope for you, but that doesn’t mean that astronomy doesn’t affect your daily life. In fact, just the opposite is true. Astronomical events are so fundamentally hard-wired into your DNA, that you unconsciously follow their patterns. Seasons are caused by the tilt of Earth’s axis. The Moon’s phase cycle affects everything from tides to fertility.

Weeks are divided into seven days, each originally to honor one of the seven moving celestial objects: Sunday is the Sun’s day; Monday (lunes) is the Moon’s day; Tuesday (martes) is Tews’s or Mars’s day; Wednesday (miercoles) is Woden’s or Mercury’s day; Thursday (jueves) is Thor’s or Jupiter’s day; Friday (viernes) is Freya’s or Venus’s day; and Saturday is Saturn’s day. Even the designations of a.m. (short for ante meridiem, means “before midday”) and p.m. (short for post meridiem, means “after midday”) are astronomical relics that remain in our lexicon.

There is one last dirty little secret that astrologers won’t tell you. Your horoscope sign is wrong by a month. Astrologers tell me that I am a Libra, and 5,000 years ago, the Sun was indeed in Libra in early October; however, thanks to a phenomenon called “precession,” the Sun drifted into Virgo in early October almost 2,000 years ago. So, should I read the Libra horoscope, or should I drift back a month to read the Virgo horoscope?

In the end it doesn’t matter. I get to choose my destiny. It is not predetermined by the random location of a few remote objects on the day I was born.

Dr. David A. Wood Jr. is the Director of Institutional Research, Planning, and Effectiveness. He is an astronomy instructor at SAC.

How San Antonio College fits in City Mission

Helen Torres
Guest Blogger

San Antonio College is participating in the upcoming STEM Expo Nov. 8-9 at the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center. This Expo aims to reach out to middle school students in five school districts: Edgewood, Southwest, South San, San Antonio and Harlandale.

Helen Torres

Helen Torres

Among the interactive sessions will be various SAC departments. These include: Dr. Dan Dimitriu, Engineering; Dan Suttin, math tutor; and Troy Touchette, Computer Information Services. Touchette will be accompanied by students from the Information and Technology and Security Academy. They took top honors in March at the CyberPatriot IV-The National High School Cyber Defense Competition in Washington, D.C.

The interactive sessions are designed to spark student interest in STEM careers at an early age. The overall goal of the college, businesses and city is to encourage engineers and scientists in San Antonio and keep the brainpower here. If we grow our city’s workforce in the STEM areas, San Antonio will attract strong business and industries that will pay competitive wages and raise income levels in San Antonio.

San Antonio College faculty have stepped up again to support community initiatives, the Mayor’s Educational 2020 goals, and support SAC’s goals of improved student success.

This partnership is a win-win for future SAC students who are being exposed to STEM careers early, and for the future workforce of the City of San Antonio.

Helen Torres, SAC’s Director of Partnerships & Extended Services, serves on the Hispanic Chamber Education Committee, and is responsible for forging college partnerships like this one with the Hispanic Chamber, UTSA, and area school districts.